Scram! Jon is painting...

By
C.F. Garde


Translation: Uffe Frode Hansen

Scram! Jon is painting...

Jon Gislason is a calm and friendly man with a glint of humour in his eye. The red hair says something about his temper, which of course he has but seldom reveals in the company of others.

It is most apparent in nis paintings, nowever, and nas been so ever since he graduated from Det Jydske Kunstakademi, 24 years ago, where he'd been taught to paint "without blue or red". Having abandoned all the accepted rules and laws of painting, and flouting all sense of tradition in his use of colour, he went on to produce one amazing painting after the other. He forced the world, so to speak, into accepting his palette. A constant stream of paintings, ranging from miniatures to huge works that fill a wall. Pure colours, and yet always with a variety and imagination that seems inexhaustible.

He paints in close contact with his his own reality. Thus the violent gush of joy, sorrow, rage, humour, eroticism and much else. He's not inclined to interpret his works. In painting them he has already spoken. Without words-for if he could use them, he wouldn't need to paint.

Nonetheless, he knows what's going on. Right now, he's heading toward something new. A change perhaps in his own view of painting. In all events, clear signals of change. This being to some degree bound up with the intensely personal experience of his mother's death. A tumult of grief, emptiness, relief and loss, which in turn he transforms to a raging expression on canvas.
Beat it! Jon's painting...
An experiment; with "undercoat" paintings in yellow on large canvasses, as a new way of getting started. Long-lettered signs a la grecque, inexplicable in themselves yet crucial for the structure of the painting. Paper things, in red, or red,and yellow, and simple drawings of sepiacoloured brushstrokes in oil. Motifs suggest themselves, and often double-headed. It couldn't be simpler, remaining both close and intimate.

Where's he heading? Is he becoming non-figurative? "No", he says "That I'll never be". He points to a shape in a big, and very yellow painting, and sure enough: the human being is always there.

"I have difficulty expressing my feelings when I'm with others" he says. "When I'm alone, I've only got the painting to shout at".

The echo lingers.

C.F. Garde

Skænderi. 2000. Acryl-Olie. 89x117 cm.

Skænderi. 2000. Acryl-Olie. 89x117 cm.